Finding a Specific JournalPrint & EJournalsLists of Legal Journals
LegalInterdisciplinaryForeign & InternationalFinding More DatabasesWebsites
Finding Strategies & Notes for Cite CheckersCore Newspapers DatabasesLinks to Major NewspapersDigitized & Print NewspapersHistorical Newspapers DatabasesLegal & International Newspapers
Author/ Article MetricsJournal MetricsMetrics in Legal Academy
By TopicBy CitationIn PDF
Get Help from Reference LibrariansHard-to-Find and Cite-SourcesLaw Library LogisticsBluebook Guides
PublicationsDatabasesResearch Guides & Citation
This is the "By Topic" page of the "Finding Articles" guide.
Alternate Page for Screenreader Users
Skip to Page Navigation
Skip to Page Content

Finding Articles  

This guide informs on finding articles and covers legal and interdisciplinary databases, newspapers and working papers.
Last Updated: Dec 1, 2017 URL: http://nyulaw.libguides.com/articles Print Guide RSS Updates

By Topic Print Page
  Search: 
 

Strategies For Finding Articles by Topic

In essence, finding articles in databases often involves a two-step process: 1) Selecting database; 2) Constructing a search string within that database.

Database Selection Tips

  • Use more than Westlaw & Lexis to search for articles. Are there interdisciplinary or subject-focused databases that might offer on-point articles? You can find databases by subject here (Law Library) and here (Bobst). Strategically think about what types of articles (law reviews? newspapers? scholarly journals from another discipline? magazines? pieces in foreign or international journals?) might be helpful and pick the database with that thought in mind.
  • Ask a reference librarian to recommend databases for your search.

      

    Journal of Economic Literature Classification Codes

    Click here or here for tips on searching with JEL Codes on EconLit. To learn about JEL codes, click here for a page created by the American Economic Association.

    Strategies For Finding Articles by Topic

    In essence, finding articles in databases often involves a two-step process: 1) Selecting database; 2) Constructing a search string within that database.

    Searching Tips

    • If you have an on-point article: 1) Mine the article's footnotes for other relevant sources; 2) See what other articles cite the on-point article; 3) Look at the article-author's other publications. Some authors will approach the same topic from more than perspective in multiple publications. Online CVs or scholarship repositories can help.
    • If your search string results in too many results to wade through: 1) Analyze the results. Are there a lot of false hits? Is there a way to rework the search string or keywords to avoid the false hits? Is there a unique keyword that would likely be in a relevant article but would not necessarily be in the false hits? Is the topic too broad? 2) Try field searching (e.g. title field or abstract field) or using boolean operators (e.g. proximity, "but not") to focus results, if those features are available in the database you are using.
    • If your search string results are too few, consider if additional search terms can be added to your search string. Try loosening boolean operators if you used them. Should your topic be broadened?
    • Use a database (like EBSCO's Legal Source) that provides subject tags for articles. When you find an on-topic article, click on the link for the subject tag to find other articles with that tag. Or if appropriate, use a database (e.g. EconLit and SSRN) that permits searching or browsing by JEL code.
    • Ask a reference librarian for assistance in modifying your search string. Come to the reference desk with some ideas for key terms.
        
      Description

      Loading  Loading...

      Tip